100 Days of Halloween: Faeries, Fates, and Hecate – Fabular Creatures, Part 2

 

100 Days of Halloween:  Faeries, Fates, and Hecate – Fabular Creatures, Part 2

Back cover of "Charlie Sullivan and the Monster Hunters: Witch Moon (Book 2)" giving a peek to Hecate, with whom Charlie comes face to face in the story.

Back cover of “Charlie Sullivan and the Monster Hunters: Witch Moon (Book 2)” giving a peek to Hecate, with whom Charlie comes face to face in the story.

For those of you who have read Charlie Sullivan and the Monster Hunters: Witch Moon (Book 2) in our young adult series, you’ll enjoy this. For those who haven’t, you’ll still enjoy this.

Let’s dive a bit into the world of Hecate.

To do so, we first must take a look at where the word “fairy” or “faerie” comes from.

“Fata -Latin. speech, speech of a god, or referring to deities of destiny.”

Dang, that sounds fancy!

But wait, doesn’t that sound familiar? Faeries…fata…Deities of Destiny….the Fates? Could it be that the faerie folk come from that ancient triumvirate believed by some to be responsible for the threads of life?

There are many triumvirates in history, and while they are not all necessarily the same, the argument is certainly there.

The Fates were three old crones acting as a single unit, all-seeing and all-knowing, popularly sharing one really gross eyeball.

“Could it be that the faerie folk come from that ancient triumvirate believed by some to be responsible for the threads of life?”

From the Fates, one could arguably go backward or forward in time to look at Hecate, another goddess trio that appears to shapeshift as one goddess or three, or three-in-one. Hecate is known as a goddess of witchcraft to many even in modern times, as a goddess of fertility and blessed crops, and of death and the otherworld. She was also the matron goddess of a cult of vampiric demons.

She is the Mother, the Maiden, and the Crone: wise, seductive, innocent. Fabular – changing based on the perceptions of those worshiping her, or by her whim.

Flash forward, and you have the Morrigna, three sisters and war goddesses of the Tuatha da Danann (a.k.a., the godlike beings that “dwindled” into the faerie folk) attacking as vicious women or flying over the battlefield as crows.

Could Hecate have been the origin of the faeries? Or is she simply one faerie that is easier to track throughout history, and one that survived with her powers in-tact thanks to her modern worshipers? The threads might be stretched a bit to make the connection here, but they are there nonetheless.

Charlie Sullivan and the Monster Hunters: Witch Moon (Book 2)

Charlie Sullivan and the Monster Hunters: Witch Moon (Book 2)

Readers of Witch Moon know that Hecate is not someone to mess lightly with. But then, neither are the dullahan, the cu sidhe, or any of the other so-called “Peaceful Folk.”

Something to think about…

Happy Halloween 2014!

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